Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum)

$3.95$8.30

Through history, fenugreek has been prized not only as a spice but also for its medicinal flowers and as cattle feed.

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Description

Native to North Africa and countries bordering the eastern Mediterranean, fenugreek is a strongly aromatic annual, growing to about thirty-two inches, producing trifolate leaves that look like clover, small, yellowish-white, pealike flowers, and sickle-shaped pods. It grows wild in open areas; but it is also widely cultivated, especially in India, Africa, and parts of the US. The seeds are collected during the autumn.

 The Egyptian Ebers papyrus (c. 1500 BCE) records a prescription for burns that included fenugreek seeds. They were also used to induce childbirth.

In the 5th century BCE, the Greek physician, Hippocrates, considered fenugreek a valuable soothing herb. His fellow countryman in the 1st century CE, Dioscorides, recommended fenugreek as a remedy for all types of gynecological problems, including infection of the uterus and inflammation of the genitals.

Through history, fenugreek has been prized not only as a spice but also for its medicinal flowers and as cattle feed. In the past, fenugreek was considered a cure for many ailments and was the major ingredient in Lydia Pinkham s Vegetable Compound, a popular 19th century patent medicine used for menstrual problems.

Key Actions

  • anti-inflammatory
  • antispasmodic (aerial parts)
  • demulcent
  • digestive tonic
  • hypoglycemic
  • lowers blood cholesterol
  • promotes milk flow
  • uterine stimulant

Key Components

  • steroids (diosgenin and progesterone)
  • alkaloids(including trigonelline and gentianine)
  • volatile oil
  • saponins (based on diosgenin)
  • flavonoids
  • mucilage (about 27%)
  • protein (about 25%)
  • fixed oil (about 8%)
  • vitamins A, B1, C
  • minerals

Additional information

Weight 1 lbs
Type & Size

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